Hunters Hill

Categories:

  • Heritage
  • Residential

Location:
Hunters Hill NSW

Client:
Private

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This client contacted TKD Architects prior to purchase for advice and concept design. At that time, the site offered an original sandstone front cottage plus a second sandstone building behind. The latter was built in the 1960’s and, though not original, the sandstone was a valued asset and reused in the reconfiguration and modernisation of the new design.

A glass breezeway wraps around a north-east facing courtyard and joins the original cottage to the modernised addition. From the street, the cottage retains its heritage values. Garage access is subtly provided through a monumental rustic wooden gate – a modern design solution, rich in both texture and character. Living, dining and entertaining on the ground level sweep seamlessly to the fully opening deck at the rear, shaded by enormous gum trees and overlooking the lawn and swimming pool. A textured rammed-earth wall expands the full length of the living area, running north/south, and discretely creates a back of house services area. A rich material palette of sandstone, various timbers, rammed earth, leather and steel is utilised both internally and externally, blurring internal and external zones. The living room ceiling plane continues out to cover the large outdoor room, useable year round, with an outdoor fireplace and deep proportions.

Passive design features are fully integrated into the contemporary home at every opportunity. Thermal mass is utilized in the concrete slab on ground, double brick walls and the rammed earth wall. The use of sustainably grown timbers for cladding and screening contributes to solar protection while creating privacy and shelter from wind. Sun protection is also achieved through external motorized louvres on the large first floor fixed northern window. The highest level of insulation achievable was utilised in the walls, floor and roof of the first floor. Rainwater is harvested from all roofs and stored in a large tank under the deck for the gardens.

Photography Credit: Michael Nicholson